proud

i miss home

attainingimaan:

most beautiful feeling when you realize your dua has been answered.

(via hana--del--rey)

aliofbabylon:

sidbringstheeid:

where is this from omg

YES.

(Source: qawiya, via clitprince)

South Asia

(Source: spacecakeofawesome, via rishtaywaliaunty)

“girl i prayed an extra rakaa just for u”

—   sheikhspeare (via labelledamee)

(via rishtaywaliaunty)

peaceforthemiddleeast:

My heart is here.

peaceforthemiddleeast:

My heart is here.

(Source: swaggieliciouz, via mxkxn)

ahappymuslimah:

safahassan99:

Fell in love when I saw this 👌👌 #muslim #islam #hijab #proud #covered #quote #beautiful

Ma sha Allah sisters 

ahappymuslimah:

safahassan99:

Fell in love when I saw this 👌👌 #muslim #islam #hijab #proud #covered #quote #beautiful

Ma sha Allah sisters 

(Source: dream-big-weirdo, via findingfatimaaa)

highfashionpakistan:

Eid Option # 2:Daaman just unveiled their Eid Collection and I must admit, I love it! They are mostly playing with beige, black and gold this Eid. Daaman is known for it’s understated style and they’re living up to it in their Eid collection. I especially love the black and gold shirt, but I know a lot of people don’t like wearing black in the Summers or on Eid which is fine because they have the gold and white version as well. Shorter hemlines are slowly making a comeback, if you want to look different this Eid, I would definitely recommend the black/gold or gold/white option. 

The best part is each piece is only $40!

You can buy them at daamandesigns.com 

maarnayeri:

What recourse do Pakistan’s ‘civilian drone victims’ have?


In 2010, after three US Hellfire missiles killed his brother and his 18-year-old son, Karim Khan approached a Pakistani lawyer to help him.
Mr. Khan’s son Zainullah Khan and his brother Asif Iqbal both worked at schools in the region. Zainullah worked as a guard at a girls’ school, and Asif worked as an English teacher in an area where both girls’ schools and schools that teach English are vulnerable to attacks by militants. Khan told the lawyer that both had chosen their jobs because they believed in the importance of education for girls.
“Karim called his son and brother ‘civilian targets,’ ” says Shehzad Akbar, the Pakistani lawyer attempting to take Khan’s case, along with 82 other families who claim to be victims of drone attacks, to Islamabad.
It’s a difficult task, made more difficult because the more than 3 million residents in Pakistan's Federally Administered Tribal Areas (FATA) have no access to legal recourse.
“Tribal areas are officially a part of Pakistan – and their residents are formally citizens of this country. But they have no access to Pakistani or international courts, and therefore no legal redress for losses incurred because of US-led drone strikes,” says Mr. Akbar.
Allegations of large numbers of civilian deaths have haunted the drone effort in Pakistan since its inception under President George W. Bush. Under the Obama administration, drone strikes have been at the core of the US strategy aimed at rooting out the Taliban and Al Qaeda from Pakistan’stribal areas, where militants have taken refuge to launch attacks in Afghanistan.
According to a report by Stanford, New York, and Columbia universities, the best available information from the Bureau of Investigative Journalism suggests that of the 2,500 to 3,000 people who have been killed since the first known drone strike in June 2004, anywhere between 450 and 881 were civilians, and another 1,300 people were injured. Those numbers are considered controversial because they rely on media accounts that often depend on the Pakistani government for information (reporters are not allowed free access to the tribal areas).
But Akbar holds up the 82 families hailing from North Waziristan as examples of the numerous non-militants who have lost their lives in drone operations – even as the Obama administration claims that the numbers are much lower and that civilian drone deaths have been rare since 2010.

maarnayeri:

What recourse do Pakistan’s ‘civilian drone victims’ have?

In 2010, after three US Hellfire missiles killed his brother and his 18-year-old son, Karim Khan approached a Pakistani lawyer to help him.

Mr. Khan’s son Zainullah Khan and his brother Asif Iqbal both worked at schools in the region. Zainullah worked as a guard at a girls’ school, and Asif worked as an English teacher in an area where both girls’ schools and schools that teach English are vulnerable to attacks by militants. Khan told the lawyer that both had chosen their jobs because they believed in the importance of education for girls.

“Karim called his son and brother ‘civilian targets,’ ” says Shehzad Akbar, the Pakistani lawyer attempting to take Khan’s case, along with 82 other families who claim to be victims of drone attacks, to Islamabad.

It’s a difficult task, made more difficult because the more than 3 million residents in Pakistan's Federally Administered Tribal Areas (FATA) have no access to legal recourse.

Tribal areas are officially a part of Pakistan – and their residents are formally citizens of this country. But they have no access to Pakistani or international courts, and therefore no legal redress for losses incurred because of US-led drone strikes,” says Mr. Akbar.

Allegations of large numbers of civilian deaths have haunted the drone effort in Pakistan since its inception under President George W. Bush. Under the Obama administration, drone strikes have been at the core of the US strategy aimed at rooting out the Taliban and Al Qaeda from Pakistan’stribal areas, where militants have taken refuge to launch attacks in Afghanistan.

According to a report by Stanford, New York, and Columbia universities, the best available information from the Bureau of Investigative Journalism suggests that of the 2,500 to 3,000 people who have been killed since the first known drone strike in June 2004, anywhere between 450 and 881 were civilians, and another 1,300 people were injured. Those numbers are considered controversial because they rely on media accounts that often depend on the Pakistani government for information (reporters are not allowed free access to the tribal areas).

But Akbar holds up the 82 families hailing from North Waziristan as examples of the numerous non-militants who have lost their lives in drone operations – even as the Obama administration claims that the numbers are much lower and that civilian drone deaths have been rare since 2010.

(via murderwhitepeople)

(Source: vinithaezhi, via hana--del--rey)

hijabihana:

bazook:

pinkypyro:

kevinsanoposts:

Six hundred goddamn AD

Six hundred. Goddamn AD.

This needs to be en-grained in every single living human.

i love this so much

hijabihana:

bazook:

pinkypyro:

kevinsanoposts:

Six hundred goddamn AD

Six hundred. Goddamn AD.

This needs to be en-grained in every single living human.

i love this so much

(Source: hadeiadel, via bl-ossomed)